Prunes in Black Tea
2
cup
Side Dish
Course
Print Recipe
Ingredients
Directions
Ingredients
1 c
water
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2 tsp
loose black tea leaves, such as English Breakfast
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1 tbsp
sugar, plus more if desired
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½ lb
prunes (about 1¼ cups with pits, about 1½ cups without)
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2
1-inch long and ½-inch wide strips of either orange or lemon zest
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Adapted from The Zuni Café Cookbook by Judy Rodgers

You can use either unpitted or pitted prunes. Instructions for both are included—because, yes, the recipe is different depending on whether the prunes’ seeds are intact. The pitted fruit is far more commonly available and works well. There’s an allure to nibbling around the pit though. Plus, an unpitted prune’s flesh retains its shape better. If you intend to go through a lot of these prunes, double the recipe.

Directions

  1. Bring the water to a simmer, turn off the heat, and add the tea leaves. Let them infuse for about 8 minutes. Strain the liquid into the heatproof container you intend to store your prunes in. Stir in the sugar until dissolved. Cool until not quite hot to the touch, about 130℉ for unpitted prunes and about 100℉ for pitted prunes. (Pitted prunes tend to dissolve more easily if the temperature is too hot. Not the end of the world; not optimal either.)
  2. Add the prunes to the container with the liquid. Don't pack the fruit. Distribute the citrus zest in the liquid. Cover and let cool completely, shaking or stirring once or twice, then store in the refrigerator. The prunes last for at least a month or so.

Scott Hocker

Scott Hocker is a writer, editor, recipe developer, cookbook author, and content and editorial consultant. He has worked in magazines, kitchens, newsletters, restaurants and a bunch of other environments he can’t remember right now. He has also been the editor in chief of both liquor.com and Tasting Table.