Our recipes and stories, delivered.

By clicking Go, I acknowledge that I have read and agree to the Penguin Random House Privacy Policy and Terms of Use and agree to receive news and updates from TASTE and Penguin Random House.

Dana Cree’s Blank Slate Philadelphia-Style Ice Cream
Ingredients
Directions
Ingredients
20 g
milk powder
Jump
150 g
sugar
Jump
380 g
cream
Jump
400 g
milk
Jump
50 g
glucose
Jump
10 g
cornstarch
Jump
20 g
cold milk
Jump
Dana Cree’s Blank Slate Philadelphia-Style Ice Cream

This recipe is a blank slate, created so you can adapt it to any flavor you like. All the recipes in this chapter are based on this formula, with adjustments made to both the ingredients and the technique. Armed with this basic recipe, you can invent any flavor of Philadelphia-style ice cream you like. I recommend it for making ice creams with bright, fresh flavors, such as herbs and flowers; teas; citrus; chocolate; alternative dairy products; and blended-in baked goods.

1-2 quarts

  1. Combine the milk powder and sugar. Mix the milk powder and sugar in a small bowl.
  2. Boil the dairy. Place the cream, milk, and glucose in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat and cook, whisking occasionally to discourage the milk from scorching, until it comes to a full rolling boil.
  3. Add and cook the milk powder. Whisk the milk powder mixture into the pot. Reduce the heat to a low simmer and continue cooking for 2 minutes, whisking to prevent scorching. Mix the cornstarch with the cold milk and whisk it into the simmering ice cream base, cooking it for 1 more minute.
  4. Chill. Immediately pour the ice cream base into a shallow metal or glass bowl. Working quickly, fill a large bowl two-thirds of the way with very icy ice water. Nest the hot bowl into this ice bath, stirring occasionally until it cools down.
  5. Strain. When the base is cool to the touch (50°F or below), strain it through a fine-mesh sieve. (This step is optional but will help ensure the smoothest ice cream possible.)
  6. Cure. Transfer the base to the refrigerator to cure for 4 hours, or preferably overnight. (This step is also optional, but the texture will be much improved with it.)
  7. Churn. Place the base into the bowl of an ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The ice cream is ready when it thickens into the texture of soft-serve ice cream and holds its shape, typically 20 to 30 minutes.
  8. Harden. To freeze your ice cream in the American hard-pack style, immediately transfer it to a container with an airtight lid. Press plastic wrap directly on the surface of the ice cream to prevent ice crystals from forming, cover, and store it in your freezer until it hardens completely, between 4 and 12 hours. Or feel free to enjoy your ice cream immediately; the texture will be similar to soft-serve.

Reprinted from Hello, My Name is Ice Cream: The Art and Science of the Scoop. Copyright © 2017 by Dana Cree. Photographs copyright © 2017 by Andrea D’Agosto. Published by Clarkson Potter, an imprint of Penguin Random House, LLC.